The Rover P5/P5B

SEL_69L

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Saw in the Rover Club Mag:
For sale:
A Rover 75, with a 4.5 V8 engine, RWD, 146,000 klm, $29,000
Possibly one of only two in Australia, approx. only 150 built.
Engine is Mustang pushrod V8, as originally built by MG Rover.
Weight 1655 kg, length 4750mm, 191 kW, 410 Nm

A real competitor to the W202 C43 AMG !
There happens to be an example currently for sale: 170,000 klm, $28,000
Weight 1570 kg, length 4515mm, 225 kW, 410 Nm



Mercedes also made about 45 W202 C55 AMG's: 270 kW, 510 Nm
 
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Styria

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Both of these cars are in generally lovely condition - on the surface. I am not particularly fond of the white walls on the two tone car. There is one aspect that really illustrates something about these Rovers and it relates to the difficulty and expertise experienced with the interiors. If you look closely, you can spot some crass quality deficiencies in the trim items and carpet areas, as well as door trims and seats. As I said, you need to look beyond the obvious that is not easily detected. Regards. Styria
 

c107

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Both of these cars are in generally lovely condition - on the surface. I am not particularly fond of the white walls on the two tone car. There is one aspect that really illustrates something about these Rovers and it relates to the difficulty and expertise experienced with the interiors. If you look closely, you can spot some crass quality deficiencies in the trim items and carpet areas, as well as door trims and seats. As I said, you need to look beyond the obvious that is not easily detected. Regards. Styria

yes the second car has not been messed with as much, but both cars seem in good shape for the prices being asked.
 
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Styria

Styria

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Have just come across this P5 Saloon which is a restoration/finishing project for the not so heart fainted. It is an early model, probably 1961/1962 Mark 1A and it needs everything other than a repaint. In fact, this car so suspiciously looks like the Mark 1A I used to own back in the late '60s, although having said that, mine was an Auto, but the colour scheme is identical.

Note that it has an early (under the dash) gear change arrangement - cute and nice and just that bit different. The same as the P4 models from 1951 up to 1964. One would have to spend many thousands on completing this car - simply a mammoth task. One thing of note - bonnet fit. I have on many occasions commented on ill fitting bonnets where the edge of the bonnet does not meet the top of the guard completely. I had this problem with my Mark III and I felt like tearing out my hair, plus loosening all the guard retaining and positioning bolts, lifting the guard and making it all fit. The other day, I removed the bonnet hinges completely and the bonnet is a good, snug fit ! Getting the adjustment right is going to be the issue - how do you loosely fit the bracket, and then lift the bonnet so that access can be gained to the mounting bolts. Fun in capital letters. Regards Styria

https://www.gumtree.com.au/s-ad/bom...mpaign=LF7-Automotive&utm_content=163436_9299
 

sean sherry

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I have always viewed these Rovers as the poor man's Rolls Royce.
In the fifties I went round Australia in a Land Rover fitted with the O/H inlet Engine .. never missed a beat...
Also .. Datsun 240Zs were the poor man's E Type. I have had both.
 

c107

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Have just come across this P5 Saloon which is a restoration/finishing project for the not so heart fainted. It is an early model, probably 1961/1962 Mark 1A and it needs everything other than a repaint. In fact, this car so suspiciously looks like the Mark 1A I used to own back in the late '60s, although having said that, mine was an Auto, but the colour scheme is identical.

Note that it has an early (under the dash) gear change arrangement - cute and nice and just that bit different. The same as the P4 models from 1951 up to 1964. One would have to spend many thousands on completing this car - simply a mammoth task. One thing of note - bonnet fit. I have on many occasions commented on ill fitting bonnets where the edge of the bonnet does not meet the top of the guard completely. I had this problem with my Mark III and I felt like tearing out my hair, plus loosening all the guard retaining and positioning bolts, lifting the guard and making it all fit. The other day, I removed the bonnet hinges completely and the bonnet is a good, snug fit ! Getting the adjustment right is going to be the issue - how do you loosely fit the bracket, and then lift the bonnet so that access can be gained to the mounting bolts. Fun in capital letters. Regards Styria

https://www.gumtree.com.au/s-ad/bom...mpaign=LF7-Automotive&utm_content=163436_9299

I remember this car from the Flynn auction. At that time I don't recall an engine being fitted but it was very cheap.
Looks like the project has overwhelmed whoever purchaed it.

I also recall it was missing the VIN plate so to build the car you would need a donor car.
 
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Styria

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Okay, we have another car, but this time it is not a 3.0/3.5 litre Saloon or Coupe. I am referring to the ill fated Rover 75 of '2000s vintage that was, with the help of BMW, to be the saviour of the Rover Company. I am highlighting the video for a number of reasons. First, and perhaps foremost, I have always considered it to be an extremely attractive car, with a beautiful interior. Additionally, whilst I have known peripheral facts, the presenter in this video is extremely easy to listen to, and his summaries of the car's fate are most enlightening.

Some two to three years ago, I came across a 75 Station Sedan - quite rare and I was told it'd be cheap(ish). When I arrived at the vendor's property, some well advanced in age purportedly Academics, it didn't take long to decide to give the car a miss. Their home and surrounding area were littered with rubbish, and the car wasn't much better, with interior trim missing, and whilst I took the car for a brief drive, it was obvious that not all was well with the engine. It was, or normally is, a V6 K-series unit, known to be extremely difficult and expensive to work on. What does Scotty Kilmer say.....stay clear of neglected cars. This one fell into that category.

Mind you, I have seen some beautiful and well cared for examples, fairly reasonably priced, but there is always that engine's reputation that needs to come into reckoning. Regards Styria

N.B. Please, persevere with the video - it is not too long, but quite informative and well presented.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o9lRffhnT-Y
 
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BenzBoy

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we went to look at and possibly buy a 75 Wagon and I thought it to be a most delightful car; a little slow but smooth and easy to live with. By the time we had decide to proceed with the sale the announcement was made that production would stop. There was a warning sign of pending doom; the major Rover retailer was operating out of an onsite portable hut in the dealer's car yard and was not sure when they would get approval for a proper showroom.
There are some bargains to be had but I have been advised by someone who was a dealer for Rover that parts are very hard to source and the initial batch of engines developed multiple faults; porous blocks, timing chain wear and warped heads. That is enough to sace anyone thinking now of buying one. It's a real shame. The 75 had a style and grace we do not often see.
Regards,
Brian
 

c107

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we went to look at and possibly buy a 75 Wagon and I thought it to be a most delightful car; a little slow but smooth and easy to live with. By the time we had decide to proceed with the sale the announcement was made that production would stop. There was a warning sign of pending doom; the major Rover retailer was operating out of an onsite portable hut in the dealer's car yard and was not sure when they would get approval for a proper showroom.
There are some bargains to be had but I have been advised by someone who was a dealer for Rover that parts are very hard to source and the initial batch of engines developed multiple faults; porous blocks, timing chain wear and warped heads. That is enough to sace anyone thinking now of buying one. It's a real shame. The 75 had a style and grace we do not often see.
Regards,
Brian

My Dad had one (Saloon, not Wagon) for a week, I think as a loan car or rental. It was still quite new. His comment was that it was nice and smooth, but had the turning radius of the QE2.
 
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Styria

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Talk about restrictive turning circles - my Captiva catches me out each and every time. Just about the only facet of the car I have not yet gotten used to. Regards Styria
 

BenzBoy

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My Dad had one (Saloon, not Wagon) for a week, I think as a loan car or rental. It was still quite new. His comment was that it was nice and smooth, but had the turning radius of the QE2.
Clearly you have never piloted a PV through a car park...….
The PV would make the QE2 quite a sharp lady.
Regards,
Brian
 

Patrick_R

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Styria,
My brand new X Trail is the same.
Shockingly bad turning circle for not a very big car.
Our Volvo B Double rated prime mover has a better turning circle than both our cars.

I have had the pleasure of being driven by Brian in the PV.
Yes, many turns lock to lock, and steers like an old Kenworth.
But still a pleasure :D
 

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