Tools & spares for trip

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Styria

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If you were to embark on a two thousand kilometre round trip, what tools and spare parts would one deem advisable to carry ? A recent break down experience really opened my eyes. I'd be very keen to obtain input on this matter. Regards Styria
 
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Styria

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A large wad of $100 notes and Styria's mobile number....;)
Regards,
Brian

BenzBoy, it wasn't the answer I was looking for ......I am really trying to get constructive responses on the matter. In any case, the $100 notes are not all that easy to come by. Who wants my mobile number ? I am ready to receive ! Regards Styria
 

Helmet

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Set of belts, top radiator hose , some vulcanizing tape, fuses, globes, ATF , water, some tools maybe a socket set, scanners, screwdrivers and some pliers. Jumper leads. May sure your spare is ok to run at highway speed .
Most important though is a thorough check before you go so you don't need to use any of the above . Cheers and have a good trip
 

Oversize

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Fire extinguisher and engine oil. SLS fluid. Emergency blocks. Zip ties. Aluminum trolley jack. However I usually find that whatever I take, I'm missing the vital tool which makes it all pointless!!! So therefore I'll add RACV membership and mobile phone!!
 
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Styria

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I guess mmbership of a road breakdown service would be quite vital, although if one was stuck in Queensland, you'd probably be still on your own trying to get back to Sydney with 900 kilometers in front of you.

As far as spares are concerned, I consider the following as essential, keeping in mind that it is usually fuel and electricity that keep you going. I would carry a spare coil, ignition module and spare fuel pump in the sparewheel compartment. In addition, at least one of the serrated metal chocks that are an MB feature. I would also carry a small four by two timber block to aid in lifting the car by means of the car jack. In my opinion, the original MB jack is not particularly well designed as it does allow the car to move in either direction. Plus the base is far too small to provide a firm footing on virgin ground. There are better designs around, such as jacks used by the Rover Company. Maybe a couple of illustrations would explain what I am talking about.

Another item that can really strand you are the small ceramic resistors - there are two of those, buried right at the bottom at the front of the left front guard - on 6.9s, quite difficult to get to - well, certainly with GB. I know for a fact if either of those resistors is faulty, you just don't go anywhere. It happened with Michel's Red Terror. No warning, no hints, just simply kaputt and the car would not start. I think Helmet is spot on when he talks about a thorough check over of the car itself. If you know your car, you will know what components are likely to be in need of replacement, such as belts, oils etc. The components that can be awkward to service/replace, and where tools will be required, are the belts, with the air con compressor belt being the worst to replace as one needs to move the alternator and power steering belts first, before you can access the compressor belt. Also, as far as the power steering belts are concerned, the fitment of those can best be described as a garage job, with access to the adjustment and fastening bolts/nuts being very awkward and difficult.

A good set of spanners and sockets are a must, particularly 17mm and 19mm, two to three adjustable spanners, and a couple of extensions. I will post some photos of the items and tools that I would carry. Ah yes, and certainly top and bottom radiator hoses.I'll do a bit more thinking about this. Regards Styria
 
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motec 6.9

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And to think i drove my 6.9 from Woomera in S.A to Perth in one go 2600km and i didnt even check the oil or tyres just made sure the fuel tank was full. With no mobile reception for 1400km on the Nullabore plains. I guess i got away with it. Geoff
 

Michel

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And to think i drove my 6.9 from Woomera in S.A to Perth in one go 2600km and i didnt even check the oil or tyres just made sure the fuel tank was full. With no mobile reception for 1400km on the Nullabore plains. I guess i got away with it. Geoff

lucky
 
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Styria

Styria

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6.9s, and probably other cars as well, should be driven without fear of breakdown. As I have stated, as well as Helmet, a well maintained vehicle will do that sort of trip easily. Items like belts, oils etc. are easily checked and, whatsmore, their condition(s) are very obvious. Radiator hoses a little less so, and I have been caught out by a busted bottom radiator hose. Incidentally, talking of hoses - don't forget the heater hoses at the back of the engine - the one on the left bank is very much an exclusive on a 6.9.

My main concern, as far as a long trip is concerned, relates to items that are not immediately obvious, and I have already referred to electric and fuel items. As far as tools are concerned, I like to be prepared, and what you will hopefully see in the photos hereunder is easily accomodated in two tool boxes. All of these are largish spanners, contained within the small toolbox that fits easily into the side compartment.

Apologies - Photobucket is again troublesome. Will attend to in due course.

Michel's breakdown, which related to the resistors, are of particular concern. I spoke to my Auto Electrician and quizzed him on the possibility of eliminating those resistors, but he seemed to think that the ignition system was designed in such a way, that they are needed. Well, I think back to my Rover V8 days and resistors were never needed. I suspect it is something to do with preventing the coil from overheating. Anyone have any ideas on this subject matter ? Incidentally, one photobucket decides to co-operate, I will raise the matter again. Regards Styria

GleamingBeautyRestoration034_zps359992fc.jpg
 
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sean sherry

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Couldn't agree more about the ignition electrics Styria.
On older Fords etc ,etc the balast resistor was there to control the voltage to the 9 volt coil. Resistor by - passed on cranking the engine, as the starter dropped the voltage to about 10 volts. Release the starter and the 9 volt coil was feed a dropped voltage through the resistor for normal running. Probably preaching to the converted here ?
P.S. I would add a couple of Relays to the list ,especially for the fuel pump.
Sean
 

Tony66_au

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Shouldn't be a problem for a well maintained vehicle :rolleyes:

:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D


ding ding ding!

We have a winner lol

I wont drive a car any distance if I dont trust it, so far the 450SEL has travelled to the local town a few times for fuel and a school pickup (The kids LOVED it) on what I call shakedown runs (Not to collect brown paper bags filled with cash BTW).

BUT if I were to drive some distance?

Spare leads, a few plugs, old dizzy cap n rotor, belts and coolant hoses, WD40 and Inox, a handful of nitrile gloves, some worm drive clips, full fuse kit, some cable (I usually have 5 meters of 7 wire trailer cable) and crimp lugs, a ball of string, some fence tie wire, gaffer, cloth and electrical tape and my small tool box inc Multimeter.

Id also have my trusty 10 lt jerry can with fuel, 5 lt of engine oil and a lt of ATF as well as my trusty 400 amp jumper cables.

Most importantly id also have my old mobile phone and external antenna (Amazing range on this thing) and RACV Gold membership which gives me free towing home from anywhere in Oz, a hire car and accommodation.

But id also have done enough preventative maintenance to drive with peace of mind because there is nothing worse than driving worried.

I also have a Sat phone although it needs a new battery and it tends to follow me around a bit considering lately the local cell towers have gone offline for almost 24 hours a few times during storms and the like.

This is contained in old Drench and Vaccination plastic tubs,(Like a milk crate but bigger and with a lid) packed in foam and secured in place in the boot of the car so I dont suffer from the dreaded "Flying Tool syndrome" where loose items in the boot punch dents in the rear 1/4's.
 

SEL_69L

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Interestingly, no one has mentioned that rubber suppension blocks should be taken on a LONG trip.
I know that they are a pain to put in place, but if your 6.9 lets you down, it would be nice to know that you could recover it to some safe place on the back of a tilt tray truck.

Can't get a 6.9 with a collapsed suspension onto a tilt tray truck without them, but it should be possible with blocks of wood of suitable size, IF you can find them, in a remote location.
 
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Styria

Styria

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The problem with rubber blocks is that they are only used on 6.9s, and very few people have them. Other than you and I, no one is known to me to have those. In any case, let me assure you that five kilometers on rubber blocks will see anyone out. You would not begin to believe how much head bumping and back thumping you'd experience. Regards Styria

N.B. As well, of course, we also have to consider what parts and tools the rest of the range may need as well, such as 280s, 450s, 500SLs etc.
 

Helmet

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Interestingly, no one has mentioned that rubber suppension blocks should be taken on a LONG trip.
I know that they are a pain to put in place, but if your 6.9 lets you down, it would be nice to know that you could recover it to some safe place on the back of a tilt tray truck.

Can't get a 6.9 with a collapsed suspension onto a tilt tray truck without them, but it should be possible with blocks of wood of suitable size, IF you can find them, in a remote location.

6.9 wasn't mentioned in the original question :rolleyes:
 

Michel

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I wont drive a car any distance if I dont trust it, so far the 450SEL has travelled to the local town a few times for fuel and a school pickup (The kids LOVED it) on what I call shakedown runs (Not to collect brown paper bags filled with cash BTW).

BUT if I were to drive some distance?

Spare leads, a few plugs, old dizzy cap n rotor, belts and coolant hoses, WD40 and Inox, a handful of nitrile gloves, some worm drive clips, full fuse kit, some cable (I usually have 5 meters of 7 wire trailer cable) and crimp lugs, a ball of string, some fence tie wire, gaffer, cloth and electrical tape and my small tool box inc Multimeter.

Id also have my trusty 10 lt jerry can with fuel, 5 lt of engine oil and a lt of ATF as well as my trusty 400 amp jumper cables.

Most importantly id also have my old mobile phone and external antenna (Amazing range on this thing) and RACV Gold membership which gives me free towing home from anywhere in Oz, a hire car and accommodation.

But id also have done enough preventative maintenance to drive with peace of mind because there is nothing worse than driving worried.

I also have a Sat phone although it needs a new battery and it tends to follow me around a bit considering lately the local cell towers have gone offline for almost 24 hours a few times during storms and the like.

This is contained in old Drench and Vaccination plastic tubs,(Like a milk crate but bigger and with a lid) packed in foam and secured in place in the boot of the car so I dont suffer from the dreaded "Flying Tool syndrome" where loose items in the boot punch dents in the rear 1/4's.

Hey Tone..... you forgot the tilt-tray in tow :p (just in case):D:D:D:D:D
 
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Styria

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Well, Photobucket has decided to co-operate - well, it did on Saturday, the last time that I checked the PC for its operation. So let me see what else needs to be taken on our mythical 2000 kms. trip.

Toolwise, I'd want to take a set of wrench operated Allen keys, also a set of small sockets and one of my main tool boxes.

GleamingBeautyRestoration033_zpsdaebb912.jpg

My main toolbox has two separate compartments, and the main area itself, as illustrated in the next photograph.

GleamingBeautyRestoration035_zpsa10f4f32.jpg

Okay, one could go on ad infinitum - it's a bit like taking four pairs of shoes and God knows how many shirts on an overnight trip. Regarding the location of the tools, the small box and the socket/allen key socket set fit nicely alongside two of the rubber blocks on the left side of the boot, and the main tool box, as well as two trays of extra tools, I fit on the floor behind the driver's seat. The spare wheel compartment takes care of the other two rubber blocks, plus coil and ignition module, but I am yet to purchase the two resistors, one of which rendered Michel's 6.9 inoperative. Also, I have just thought of this - the green trigger wire that leads from the distributor to the ignition module. A spare one of those would be advisable, but they are quite expensive to buy from the dealerships.

Any other comments or suggestions ? Regards Styria

N.B. Apologies, I forgot to include the GB tool roll that I like to take just for show - hardly anyone ever looks at them ! Ah well, I do.

GleamingBeautyRestoration178-1.jpg
 
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Styria

Styria

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I am glad you had a look at the 'masterpiece' - and yes, the tool roll is a product of Parks' skill in implementing my design......and it is genuine leather that has been used. GAHH leather. Regards Styria
 

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